Web Design Critique: Salesforce Health Cloud

5

Salesforce says that they’re there to provide healthcare cloud solutions, with best practice support and improvements that allow what they call the Fourth Industrial Revolution to improve people’s lives and healthcare by making these developments easier to use and access. If their site is any indication, they’re well on their way to do that.

The site uses bright, welcoming, colours, with a colour palette of white, sky blue, and cobalt blue. This monochromatic mix is bright, yet cool, creating an overall relaxing feel to the site, which is something you’d want when tackling healthcare.

The first thing you’ll see past the clearly labelled main menu bar, is the header of a nurse working on a tablet, which immediately tells you what the site is about. Straightforward and simple. Whilst the header seems a bit big, it actually doesn’t take up much in terms of space, due to the side navigation tab and several links to promotional media. A fairly straightforward presentation, with minimal fluff.

Speaking of the side navigation tab, it’s always following you with a Watch Demo link, as well as the contact info of Salesforce always in full display, allowing for ease of contact. Notably, it only becomes a real focus once someone scrolls down, which, in a way, tells people “If you’re scrolling down, you must be interested. Wanna talk?”. The chat and feedback box behaves pretty much the same way; they’re always there, but they’re not hogging the attention. Even marketing is built into the design, and its good.

Speaking of scrolling down, there will be a lot of it if you go and visit the site, as it relies heavily on visual aids. Granted, every subsection has to account for everything, but still, it’s a bit of a load, both to networks and patience.

Though the site does heavily rely on visual aids, it is straightforward in their use. A bit of text to give a brief explanation or promote a short slogan, then a link to something that provides further information on things like best practice support, whether another page or supplementary media, like an e-book. Again, there just happens to be a lot of stuff to go through.

First, it’s the main menu, then header, then learn more. THEN you get to information on providers, followed by the same for payers, followed by news, followed by a screenshot of the actual software like a sample. After that, is the promotion for the health cloud itself, then a link to a customer success story, a link to their infographic, an intro to their sales pitch, and then, the bottom of the screen shows. Overall, the design is solid, but needs to take into account how a single page of theirs chews through network bandwidth.

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