Web Design Critique: Market Sports Online

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If you’re shopping through an AFL store, or any store for that matter, the only time you want to read through a wall of text regarding the company you’re dealing with, is when you want to make sure you’re not getting ripped off.

The Market Sports website has a barebones “About Us” page, which tells you enough to assure you that you’re at a trusted site, with a list of the official product providers, like ISC and New Balance. Now, obviously, there isn’t just one subpage in the “About Us” page, but they all have the bare minimum text. They tell you the necessary info; payment options, terms and conditions, that sort of thing, and then they move on. Now, a bit more text would be helpful, after all, there’s such a thing as “reading the fine print” and Terms and Conditions are definitely where you want that.

The rest of the site is as about as forthcoming with text; relying primarily on visual aids to operate. That being said, being greeted immediately with a header that tells you that shipping is free across Australia for any order worth more than $125 is very reassuring, considering how problematic shipping can be when it comes to these things, so that’s definitely a strong point.

The header itself also follows you around as you scroll through the pages, which is useful since it has links to visitor account and the shopping cart; things you obviously want to keep a close eye on when you’re shopping, regardless of whether or not its an AFL store you’re browsing through.

As we’ve mentioned before, the site uses as little text as possible, preferring to use visual aids and indicators to help people with their shopping. The banner’s a link to special offers and new releases, and the links to each footy team’s merchandise listings is marked by a square bearing the team colours. The site’s motto is “AFL shopping 100% Simple, Secure and Pain Free!”, and it certainly does well to hold up to that motto, with little unnecessary fluff filling up the screen.

The site’s basically, offers, products, teams, listings and merchandise; with little else. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing, mind you, but additional info for the legal matters, the Terms and Conditions, that sort of thing, would be well appreciated. In terms of operating as an AFL store site, it does its job really well, but more detailed info would be reassuring.

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