Web Design Critique: Boardwalk Catering

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A straightforward, black and white site, contrasted with vibrant imagery of delicious, well-catered food. That’s what’ll greet people who visit the site of Boardwalk Catering, a wedding caterer in Sydney, one that believes in good imagery, if their site is anything to go by.

The site sports a straightforward layout, the header, with the mandatory links to all of the other parts of the site, as well as sites to Facebook and Instagram. Immediately after that, are the images of the catering that the company provides.

Notably, there’s a distinct lack of account control options, like Log In, with the only way to stay in contact with the catering service being the “Contact” page, which has a link in the main header. That being said, the contact is only for a single event, which might be problematic for anyone looking to hire this particular wedding caterer in Sydney for repeat events.

For the main page, these images are presented in a slideshow, and act as links to the company’s services.

Save for the images in Venues and the Main Pages, these image don’t link to anything. They may be clicked on to see a bigger version, but not much else besides that, which does come across as a bit of a waste of space.

Not to say that these images aren’t well-done though. Quite the contrary, the images are exceptionally done, and greatly presented, letting them give the site that splash of colour, and energy it really needs. These beautiful images are strewn across the site’s pages, making them feel memorable, and gives visitors a good idea of what to expect from this wedding caterer in Sydney, which is always a plus when you’re marketing.

The icon for Facebook and Instagram sport a black and white colour scheme, not their usual, more iconic iterations, which is strange for social media sites, which are heavily reliant on being bright and bold to stand out. This is somewhat indicative of the site’s biggest shortcoming.

The images on the site are well-done, well-presented and appealing, there is little doubt about that. However, the monotonous black and white colour scheme that it uses, combined with fairly small text, does make the site come across as barren, at least in the areas where there’s little images, only the fairly verbose walls of text that the site sports.

It feels as if the site invested too much into the images, to the detriment of everything else. Yes, they’re the lynchpin of the site’s identity, but everything needs to feel distinct and noteworthy, too.

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